search for




 

Clinical Impact of Smartphone with Iris Recognition Scanner on Visual Function in Normal Adults
Ann Optom Contact Lens 2019;18:46-50
Published online June 25, 2019
© 2019 The Korean Optometry & Contact Lens Study Society

Suk-Gyu Ha, MD, PhD, Young-Woo Suh, MD, PhD, Seung-Hyun Kim, MD, PhD

Department of Ophthalmology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: Seung-Hyun Kim, MD, PhD
Department of Ophthalmology, Korea University Anam Hospital, #73 Goryeodae-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea
Tel: 82-2-920-5520, Fax: 82-2-924-6820
E-mail: ansaneye@hanmail.net
Received March 12, 2019; Revised June 12, 2019; Accepted June 12, 2019.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Purpose: Smartphone with iris recognition scanner uses using infrared-A wave. The aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of smartphone with iris recognition scanner on the visual function of normal adults.
Methods: Normal, healthy volunteers were divided into 2 groups according to the type of smartphone used: the photo camera and iris recognition scanner groups. Ocular changes were measured before and immediately after ocular exposure (both eyes) for 10 seconds. Ocular examinations, including measurement of visual acuity (logarithm of minimal angle of resolution), refractive error (diopters), grading of the corneal stain score (0 to 5), ocular surface temperature (°C), and pupil diameter (mm) were performed.
Results: A total of 60 volunteers were enrolled in the study. Thirty volunteers each were included in the photo camera and iris recognition scanner groups. The mean age were 38.5 ± 9.3 years and 37.6 ± 6.8 years, respectively. There were no significant changes in the ocular measurements immediately after exposure to the photo camera and iris recognition scanner (p > 0.05 for all).
Conclusions: There were no clinically significant effects on normal adult eyes after exposure to smartphone with iris recognition scanner.
Keywords : Iris; Recognition; Smartphone; Vision


June 2019, 18 (2)