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A Case of Primary Mucinous Adenocarcinoma in Lateral Upper Eyelid
Ann Optom Contact Lens 2018;17:64-67
Published online September 25, 2018
© 2018 The Korean Optometry & Contact Lens Study Society

Min-Ji Kang, MD, Ji-Hyun Kim, MD, Suk-Woo Yang, MD, PhD

Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: Suk-Woo Yang, MD, PhD
Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, #222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 06591, Korea
Tel: 82-2-2258-2846, Fax: 82-2-599-7405
E-mail: yswoph@catholic.ac.kr
Received May 15, 2018; Revised June 25, 2018; Accepted June 27, 2018.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Purpose: To report a rare case of a primary mucinous adenocarcinoma from the eccrine gland.
Case summary: A 50-year-old man visited the clinic presented with a non-tender, lobulated, and cyst-like mass at the left upper lid, which had slowly grown over three months. He already received lid mass excision at local clinic, and a mucinous eccrine adenocarcinoma was diagnosed preliminarily on the histological exam. He was referred to our hospital for further evaluation and management. Systemic evaluation was planned to evaluate the origin of adenocarcinoma. Orbit magnetic resonance imaging, whole-body positron emission tomography scan, duodenoscopy, and thyroid sonography was done. There was no abnormality except thyroiditis. Secondary surgical excision was planned to confirm the clear margin. Pentagonal wedge resection was performed and there was no evidence of local invasion. We re-evaluated histologic exam using immunohistochemistry and it was also corresponded with the preliminary diagnosis as a mucinous eccrine adenocarcinoma. Finally diagnosed as the primary mucinous eccrine adenocarcinoma of eyelid, there has been no recurrence so far for 2 years.
Conclusions: The occurrence of primary mucinous eccrine adenocarcinoma in eyelid is rare. Therefore careful systemic evaluation and immunohistochemistry should be done to differentiate the primary and metastatic lesion. Furthermore long term regular follow-up is needed to detect local recurrence.
Keywords : Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Eyelids; Sweat glands


September 2018, 17 (3)